Issues Magazine

Articles about water

Huge Scope to Store More Water Underground

NCGRT team-member Stephanie Villeneuve sampling and testing groundwater. Credit: Heidi Linehan/Heidi Who Photos.

NCGRT team-member Stephanie Villeneuve sampling and testing groundwater. Credit: Heidi Linehan/Heidi Who Photos.

By National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training

There is potential to store large volumes of Australia’s freshwater underground to offset climate change, avoid evaporation losses and meet national water needs into the future.

Researchers in the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) say that managed aquifer recharge – the injection or infiltration of excess surface water into underground aquifers – could help secure the nation’s water supplies for an uncertain future. With bigger droughts and floods forecast under climate change, along with rapidly rising demand from growing cities and industries, managing water wisely will be central to the nation’s future prosperity and sustainability, says Professor Tony Jakeman of NCGRT and the Australian National University.

The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training is an Australian Government initiative supported by the Australian Research Council and the National Water Commission.

Reflections on Urban Use of Recycled Water

By Max Thomas

Recycled water is a valuable urban resource, but indiscriminate use can have serious environmental consequences.

The state government of Victoria deserves credit for its leadership in the move towards conservation and better management of water. Recycling of treated wastewater is one of the strategies being promoted.

The use of recycled water for irrigation of pasture and crops has been common practice in country Victoria for many years. This form of water reuse is done by skilled operators according to EPA guidelines designed to protect human and animal health as well as groundwater, soils and waterways.

Water: What’s in Store?

By Greg Leslie

Access to clean water, its use on arable land and the damage it does during extreme weather are the big challenges for today’s water management.

Water shapes ecosystems, landscapes and human society; it sets the conditions under which life exists on Earth. Absence of water means absence of life.